raw-fed-pets:

Dogs’ Evolution Shows Why They ‘Love’ Gnawing on Bones
Scientists say they have discovered why dogs love to eat meat and bones.
Ancient canines adopted pack-living about eight million years ago, to hunt larger prey, according to researchers.The resulting evolution of their jaws gradually turned the ancestors of modern wolves, and ultimately our own pets, into “hypercarnivores”. He and his colleagues from the National University of Colombia have created a canine “family tree”, piecing together the relationships between each of the more than 300 dog species.
The only way that dogs roaming the open plains could snatch very large prey from a herd was to work together.”And after many generations of this grouping behaviour, there are new selective pressures on their [skull shape],” said the researcher. This pressure meant that animals with larger teeth and stronger jaws were more likely to succeed in hunting, and to survive to pass on their large-toothed, strong-jawed genes to the next generation.
Animals with stronger jaws and larger canine teeth would have been more successful hunters. "They developed strength in their muscles - especially the muscles that close their mouth," said Dr Munoz-Doran. "And bones that are more resistant to bending, so they could support the mechanical strains of biting the prey. Over time, they became adapted to be ‘hypercarnivorous’."The researcher pointed out that domestic dogs had "very good evolutionary reasons to enjoy chewing a bone".
"They have the tools to do that, and they want to use their tools".
Source Article: BBC

raw-fed-pets:

Dogs’ Evolution Shows Why They ‘Love’ Gnawing on Bones

Scientists say they have discovered why dogs love to eat meat and bones.

Ancient canines adopted pack-living about eight million years ago, to hunt larger prey, according to researchers.The resulting evolution of their jaws gradually turned the ancestors of modern wolves, and ultimately our own pets, into “hypercarnivores”. He and his colleagues from the National University of Colombia have created a canine “family tree”, piecing together the relationships between each of the more than 300 dog species.

The only way that dogs roaming the open plains could snatch very large prey from a herd was to work together.”And after many generations of this grouping behaviour, there are new selective pressures on their [skull shape],” said the researcher. This pressure meant that animals with larger teeth and stronger jaws were more likely to succeed in hunting, and to survive to pass on their large-toothed, strong-jawed genes to the next generation.

Animals with stronger jaws and larger canine teeth would have been more successful hunters. "They developed strength in their muscles - especially the muscles that close their mouth," said Dr Munoz-Doran. "And bones that are more resistant to bending, so they could support the mechanical strains of biting the prey. Over time, they became adapted to be ‘hypercarnivorous’."The researcher pointed out that domestic dogs had "very good evolutionary reasons to enjoy chewing a bone".

"They have the tools to do that, and they want to use their tools".

Source Article: BBC

funny-looking-rabbit:

When considering getting a bunny, one of the first questions you’ll ask yourself is where that bunny will live. It’s very popular to keep rabbits outdoors in a wire-bottom hutch. It’s also a terrible idea to keep rabbits outdoors in a wire-bottom hutch.

This is a…

memily:

adorabelledearheart:


thepliablefoe:


Norwegian forest cats are the best.
They look like little snow lions.


MORE REASONS WHY NORWEGIAN FOREST CATS ARE THE BEST:
The colloquial term for them is “skogkatten”.
They’re also called “fairy cats” in Norway, because they’re so pretty.
They run down trees headfirst.
They’re fricking gigantic and they purr really loud.
They literally walk over snow like motherloving Legolas.
In Norse mythology, skogkatts pull the goddess Freya’s carriage.
Who doesn’t want a carriage pulled by cats?
Viking cats. End of story.


Oh what a terrible thing it appears that I haven’t reblogged these glorious beasts this year yet

memily:

adorabelledearheart:

thepliablefoe:

Norwegian forest cats are the best.

They look like little snow lions.

MORE REASONS WHY NORWEGIAN FOREST CATS ARE THE BEST:

The colloquial term for them is “skogkatten”.

They’re also called “fairy cats” in Norway, because they’re so pretty.

They run down trees headfirst.

They’re fricking gigantic and they purr really loud.

They literally walk over snow like motherloving Legolas.

In Norse mythology, skogkatts pull the goddess Freya’s carriage.

Who doesn’t want a carriage pulled by cats?

Viking cats. End of story.

Oh what a terrible thing it appears that I haven’t reblogged these glorious beasts this year yet

(via redroseredrum)

welcome-to-the-crabitat:

chasteblowjay:

Hermit crabs are not $15 pets you buy at the boardwalk and keep for a month in a mesh cage or plastic critter keeper. It took me a minimum of $80 usd to create a BARE BONES MINIMUM SETUP. Even then there was so much lacking in their habitat, so…

lzbth:

swag won’t pay the bills but apparently neither will your degree

(via super-saiyan-princess)

animalwelfarists:

Cats love fish, perpetuated by cartoons and other media, this is a widely accepted fact… but, is it good for them?

Fish are a great food, an excellent source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids while being low in fat - unfortunately, almost all fish are contaminated with mercury, some more…

My lovely 17 year old mancat, Pounce, has hyperthyroidism, most likely due to fish consumption. He got very high quality dry and canned food throughout his adult life, grain free wellness. So it’s not just low quality foods. He now has to eat crappy medicated vet food… Not my choice, he be on raw if it were up to me. But anywho, keep this is mind for all kitties!

dogjournal:

THE “DRIVEN TO BARK” CAMPAIGN 
Petplan has started the 'Driven to Bark' campaign to raise awareness about the dangers of leaving dogs in hot cars. There is also a White House petition which encourages the passing of laws to address this issue. Unfortunately we hear reports every summer about dogs being left inside hot cars. Click here to learn more about the Driven to Bark campaign. Please share!  dogjournal:

THE “DRIVEN TO BARK” CAMPAIGN 
Petplan has started the 'Driven to Bark' campaign to raise awareness about the dangers of leaving dogs in hot cars. There is also a White House petition which encourages the passing of laws to address this issue. Unfortunately we hear reports every summer about dogs being left inside hot cars. Click here to learn more about the Driven to Bark campaign. Please share! 

dogjournal:

THE “DRIVEN TO BARK” CAMPAIGN 

Petplan has started the 'Driven to Bark' campaign to raise awareness about the dangers of leaving dogs in hot cars. There is also a White House petition which encourages the passing of laws to address this issue. Unfortunately we hear reports every summer about dogs being left inside hot cars. Click here to learn more about the Driven to Bark campaign. Please share! 

(via handsomedogs)

pawsitivelypowerful:

twobigears:

baddognono:

twobigears:

Excellent blog post making the rounds on Facebook. So many people, especially agility people, fail to understand that arousal and drive are not the same thing. I didn’t either for a while, I just knew I didn’t like Ryker’s crazy barking before his agility runs and that he was only winding himself up into a frenzy with it. Requiring him to be quiet and focused outside the ring has been tough but it has made him work better. It certainly hasn’t killed his drive. I actually saw someone at the trial this weekend encouraging her dog to stare and bark and get excited by the dog running the course. Really????

This comment sums up my thoughts perfectly:

"Still it’s very hard to convince the handlers in the highest levels of competition that their dogs would be more focused and able to perform better if they learned to control themselves and not bark en scream for half an hour before they had to perform. They think the dog is showing it’s drive, that he want to perform, while in fact the dog is in overdrive and out of control.
They still think that that frantic behavior leads to the best results on the course. And that, if they would teach the dog some self-control, the dog will be slower on the course.”

This reminds me a lot of the phrase “leaking drive”. I forget where I saw it/heard it but someone told me that when the dog is so aroused that they’re screaming, they’re “leaking drive” because the arousal is taking all the energy/attention/drive away from the dog’s actual work.

I used to stop to watch the agility dogs when I did conformation work but always left because I couldn’t stand the screaming and whining from certain dogs.

It is basically leaking drive, which is talked about a lot in GSD/Malinois circles. Leaking is a problem by itself because the dog can work himself up so that he can’t think, but especially a problem when it manifests as jerky behaviors like barking/screaming at another dog working. Which is unfortunately common at agility trials, and the main reason I don’t do flyball. Ryker is a pretty big leaker but getting better. He barks when excited and can be pretty whiney too.

This is a good article. It’s a huuuuge pet peeve of mine when people praise the frantic dog over the collected dog who brings his drive to the table when needed.

Dakota gets called “low drive” a lot because he’s fairly laidback when not working (we did a lot of calmness exercises for service dog public access training), and he can be hard to “wake up” and get into a work mode sometimes but once he does he has a good amount of workable drive. Not high by any means, but definitely not a low “deadhead”. Unless we’re talking live game or lure coursing, then the beast comes out.

Dakari on the other hand is a bit more on the side of “frantic” and her crazy gets praised a lot but she’s easily distracted from the task, so we usually keep sessions short and sweet. VS Dakota who I can work for an hour plus with his flirt pole toy.

(via simply-canine)