unhappyhorses:

I hear a lot of people who love the idea of clicker training, have gotten a few basic behaviors, and want to go further, but aren’t sure how. For those of you in that position, I’m about to share with you the three biggest tools you need to clicker train. Each of these three…

prairiegsds:

Interesting article that suggests that there is value in including less desirable dogs in your breeding plan. This makes sense from a straight AA, Aa, aa, etc. stand point but what does this look like in reality for the resulting pups?

(via tigerskinsandotherthings)

handsomedogs:

{x}{x}
Would You Rather…
Have a Scottish Terrier or a West Highland Terrier?

Scottie! Not gunna lie, it’d be purely because of the lady and the tramp. handsomedogs:

{x}{x}
Would You Rather…
Have a Scottish Terrier or a West Highland Terrier?

Scottie! Not gunna lie, it’d be purely because of the lady and the tramp.

handsomedogs:

{x}{x}

Would You Rather…

Have a Scottish Terrier or a West Highland Terrier?

Scottie! Not gunna lie, it’d be purely because of the lady and the tramp.

animalobservationist:

I find it interesting during adoption follow-ups how many people tell me that they absolutely love their new dog but he was very clearly abused in his previous home. When I ask what makes them say that I get all sorts of answers. “When I opened an umbrella, he completely panicked! Obviously he was beaten with one.” “He hates men in hats, I think his previous owner wore hats a lot and abused him.” “When the phone rings and I stand up quickly, he shoots across the room and cowers. He obviously was severely mistreated at some point.” 

We’ve adopted out a lot of dogs with abusive backgrounds, some with fear issues, some without. But the majority of the behaviors people are describing when they assume abuse are not from abuse at all but from a lack of socialization. Your new dog is scared of umbrellas? How many interactions did he have with umbrellas as a puppy, he probably has no idea what that thing is or what it’s going to do next. Scared of men in hats? Was he exposed to a lot of men in hats as a puppy? If not, this is completely new information to a dog who now has to make sense of why some people wear strange things on their heads. Some dogs are just more fearful than others, someone standing up quickly can be very startling but it doesn’t mean he’s reacting because he was abused.

I had a dog that I raised from 8 weeks old that I socialized to (almost) everything. What did I forget? Bubblegum. He wasn’t around someone chewing bubblegum until he was almost a year old and he was so scared of them blowing and popping bubbles he was scrambling to find a way out of the room. I can promise you that I (nor anyone else) had ever abused him while chewing bubblegum, but I’m sure someone not knowing his background would find a way to make that assumption. 

(This isn’t meant to downplay the effect of abuse on dogs, but instead emphasize the importance of creating positive associations with things for your puppy/dog.) Also, the puppy in this video is adorable.

(via perfectdogs)

ivyarchive:

mymodernmet:

Illustrator Lili Chin's adorable series Dogs of the World illustrates 192 breeds of dogs grouped according to geographical origin.

More:











ivyarchive:

mymodernmet:

Illustrator Lili Chin's adorable series Dogs of the World illustrates 192 breeds of dogs grouped according to geographical origin.

More:











ivyarchive:

mymodernmet:

Illustrator Lili Chin's adorable series Dogs of the World illustrates 192 breeds of dogs grouped according to geographical origin.

More:











ivyarchive:

mymodernmet:

Illustrator Lili Chin's adorable series Dogs of the World illustrates 192 breeds of dogs grouped according to geographical origin.

More:











ivyarchive:

mymodernmet:

Illustrator Lili Chin's adorable series Dogs of the World illustrates 192 breeds of dogs grouped according to geographical origin.

More:











ivyarchive:

mymodernmet:

Illustrator Lili Chin's adorable series Dogs of the World illustrates 192 breeds of dogs grouped according to geographical origin.

More:

ivyarchive:

mymodernmet:

Illustrator Lili Chin's adorable series Dogs of the World illustrates 192 breeds of dogs grouped according to geographical origin.

More:

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(via liamdryden)

Q

Anonymous asked:

I always thought fixing your pets was totally okay and a good thing to do. What's the problem with it exactly?

A

pokeywhippet:

huskyhuddle:

Before I answer your question I’m going to tell you that this subject tends to be highly controversial in the pet world. Vets have different opinions, owners have different opinions etc. 

Bluntly, is it okay to rip out all the reproductive organs of your female dogs because it makes your life easier, or because it makes them “more manageable,” or because you want to be able to leave her outside without supervision? NO

Is it ok to neuter males because you want him to be easier to control and because you don’t feel like watching your dog? NO

Spaying entails that ALL reproductive organs are removed, and neutering means that you are removing a male’s testicles to prevent sperm production. It hurts, it sucks, they are under anesthesia in an unfamiliar place, its rather terrifying. 

Spaying and neutering should be done, in my opinion, ONLY for the HEALTH of the animal. Female dogs when fixed too early can have health issues, Ani is one of these… We were told by our vet to get her fixed at four months, and we were told that there were no harmful consequences. The asshole lied. We fixed her at five months BEFORE her first heat and she now has chronic UTIs because her lady parts are not fully developed because the removal of her reproductive organs cuts off the hormone reproduction that would have matured these part of her body during her heat. She has issues with UTIs like I said, perpetual PH issues, and might have to face surgery to remove the flap that covers her vulva. It sucks and its painful for her to have to deal with.

Choosing not to fix your dog means that you have to take responsibility for your dog. You don’t take females in heat out in public, or to the dog park. Males need to be trained to not mount and have a tad bit of self control. But this is just plain too hard for some people. Oh no we can’t take our dog to the park because she might get pregnant, lets fix her! oh no my dog mounts, lets fix him! oh no having to deal with an animal that has hormone fluctuations and is a bit moodier (LIKE PEOPLE) how difficult, lets chop up their insides! Oh darn pets are just soooo inconvenient.

There are GOOD reasons to fix your dog. It acts as a cancer preventative, females in particular are at a much higher risk for cancer when they remain unfixed. Its acceptable for multiple dog households with females and males to be fixed. It is impossible to watch your dog 24/7 we fixed Ani, Hubble and Balto because our contract stated we HAD to and because the puppies from a brother and sister would have been unhealthy. If ani went into heat around two males, (Balto and Hubble) I don’t want to be breaking up fights over who gets to impregnate her. Ani and Balto are not breed standard. Hubble also has a physical deformity (his tail) and we aren’t even going to be accidentally passing that on, and his contract stated that at an appropriate age he was to be fixed. Hubble’s brother only had one testicle so he was fixed because you don’t want to be passing that on and because of his risk for cancer.

Shelters and rescues push fixing despite the health risks, sexual and physical immaturity because they assume people suck and a lot of them don’t want to bother educating people about having an unaltered dog. Dogs are fixed at 8 fucking weeks… TINY BABIES are fixed at shelters without regard for what this can do to them…  I just think you shouldn’t be able to have a dog if you can’t handle all that comes with it. We don’t neuter and spay our kids because we don’t want to teach them about safe sex or because its just soooo hard to keep your 13 year old from getting preggo, or because dammit my daughter is annoying and sensitive while on her period…. But my mom is getting a total hysterectomy because of her cancer and people proactively remove their breasts and reproductive organs to prevent cancer… There are differences.

Unfixed animals require more responsibility. Most people aren’t up for it. If you fix your dog because you think it makes them more manageable then you shouldn’t have a dog. If you fix your dog because you can’t be bothered to not take your dog in public while in heat, or because you don’t want to teach you male not to mount, then you don’t need a dog. (or kids) I grew up with unaltered GSDs and my mom used to breed cocker spaniels, there was not a single oops litter. There were unfixed males and females and there was never an issue. Heidi (our gsd) was separated from rebel, Gunner, Olex, and Rommel when she was in heat. The males were taught that mounting anyone or anything is a no no. Our cockers were the same. 

Its only recently that things have changed, instead of doing whats best for our pets we do what is easiest for us. If your intentions are to make your dog manageable or because you are lazy then you don’t deserve a dog. If you are fixing your dog for the good of their health then more power to you. If you decide to have an unfixed pet then you HAVE to take responsibility for your dog and any oops litters, whether that means aborting the puppies or finding homes for them and taking care of any puppies you can’t home. 

There are a lot of people who disagree with me. I will point out though that its the USA that does this, fixing pets automatically, many other countries don’t do this. I recently met someone from New Zealand that was horrified when I told her that shelters fix pups and that its common procedure to fix animals just because. Basically Americans tend to be lazy irresponsible assholes at the detriment of our children and our pets. 

This is really an excellent & well-educated stance on speutering.
& I agree with a lot of what is said here.

I’m just gunna leave this here.

raw-fed-pets:

So to Reiterate… (sorry followers this is last you will hear of it)


-I have provided scientific evidence of toxic heavy metals in pet foods drastically exceeding the established safe upper limit. This speaks for itself. Actual proven evidence that the safe levels have been well exceeded.

-I have provided a detailed account of textbook canine carnivorous biology. This is science, and in itself shows that the dog is primed for an animal based diet.  I will outline again below, and even compare this physiology to omnivores and herbivores. This biology is a fundamental reason why raw feeding is important.

-I have provided 3 studies showing that dogs are healthier on high protein diets, and mortality is actually increased on low protein diets. This is in response to your totally incorrect statement that protein may actually cause harm. Kibble generally ranges from 50-70% carbohydrate. Raw diets are based on protein and fat - the only two macronutrients dogs need. Heavy carbohydrate loads are only incorporated for the manufacturers benefit, as these ingredients are very cost-effective, increase shelf-life, and are absolutely essential to the kibble base.

-I have provided 13 human studies showing the negative effects of refined high carbohydrate diets. You have no been able to prove that these diets are healthy for dogs, so this evidence is +1 for raw feeding, in combination with canine protein studies.

-You have provided a study showing that wild and domestic cats do not have significant differences in the rates of periodontal disease (same as AWD - conveniently you chose a skull as similar as possible despite the massive differences amongst canine breeds). The same study however, found that wild cats had drastically less calculus than domestic cats . This suggests that periodontal disease is caused by other factors than just unclean teeth, but doesnt change the fact that whole prey was proven to maintain better hygiene. Note that dental calculus (as seen in domestic) does predict future periodontal disease though too.

-You have resorted to insults instead of providing any actual evidence that kibble is healthy long-term for dogs.

Canine biology:

-Short simple gut, designed to push animal products through quickly. If meat were to sit for long periods of time bacteria could potentially multiply to harmful levels. Omnivores and herbivores have longer GI tracts in order for plant material to slowly break down and ferment.

-Dogs lack the enzymes to break down plant material in its raw form, and can only digest it when cooked (similar to cats and other carnivores). Omnivores and herbivores have such enzymes which are combined with various other physiological traits, such as grinding teeth, in order to facilitate breakdown of plant matter.

-Highly acidic gastric acid. Designed to neutralize any harmful pathogens in carrion (scavengers), meat and feces.

-Pointed dentition, designed to hold, rip and tear meat from bone. Dogs lack the flattened molars seen in omnivores for the purpose of grinding plant matter. Carnassial Pair: This pair of teeth is a characteristic of the order carnivora, specifically the suborder feliformia and caniform . The Carnassial Pair specializes in tearing meat and slicing through tendons. Small pointed  incisors:  these are for nibbling meat from the bone. Four premolars line each side of the upper and lower jaws in back of the canines. Premolars are for tearing, and ridged molars for crushing bone (not chewing or masticating like in humans). These are the shearing teeth, used to rip chunks of flesh from prey animals. Canine teeth: these are for grabbing and puncturing prey.

-The salivary glands serve merely to lubricate, and do not have an important digestive function. Food is rarely chewed into small portions, but ‘wolfed’ down whole.

-Salivary lysozyme. This is an antimicrobial enzyme useful for management of bacteria found in rotten food, carcasses and feces.

-Lack of salivary amylase. This is found in omnivores and herbivores, and starts the process of breaking down carbohydrates in the mouth.

-A single hinge joint that lays in the same plane as the teeth, like other mammilian carnivores.

-The majority of mammalian carnivores have eyes are set relatively centrally on the face, in a way that allows visual acuity and depth perception in front of the animal. In contrast, the eyes of horses, cows, deer, and other prey species are set more toward the sides of the head, allowing an almost panoramic range of vision (roughly 350 degrees in horses). This feature allows plant-eating prey to have a wide range of vision in order to spot predators.

-Carnivores have a wide mouth opening in relation to their head size. This confers obvious advantages in developing the forces used in seizing, killing and dismembering prey. Facial musculature is reduced since these muscles would hinder a wide gape, and play no part in the animal’s preparation of food for swallowing.

-The primary muscle used for operating the jaw in carnivores is the temporalis muscle. This muscle is so large in carnivores that it accounts for most of the bulk of the sides of the head. The angle of the mandible in carnivores is small. This is because the masseter and pterygoids that attach there are of minor importance in these animals.  Shoulder blades are detached from the skeleton to allow for greater flexibility and speeds while running.

-The pancreas is V-shaped in carnivores. This elongated gland is made up of groups of cells called acini that produce digestive enzymes and secrete them into the pancreatic duct as pancreatic juice. Secretion occurs after the dog has eaten. The pancreas can secrete amylase in response to carbohydrates, like in many mammalian carnivores (including cats, obligate carnivores). Dogs are very adaptable and are often labelled opportunistic carnivores. They lack the requirement for any carbohydrates in their diet. Most plant proteins are incomplete and therefore manufacturers must add a variety of chemical isolates to their product following cooking. These pre-mixes (similar to vitamin pills) allows for survival, similar to in cats, many of whom are also on kibble diets.

-The dogs lower jaw cannot physically move sideways. This is a function that allows omnivores (and herbivores) to grind plant material in order to aid pre-digestion.  Note that your own lower jaw has lateral movement to facilitate side-to-side chewing and grinding. When the jaw of a carnivore closes, the blade-shaped cheek molars slide past each other to give a slicing motion that is very effective for shearing meat off bone.  The temporal bone, the Mandibular fossa, features a deep C shape that does not permit lateral movement in the jaw.

-The liver of a carnivore has the capacity to eliminate far more uric aid than the liver of an omnivore or herbivore. Uric acid is necessary to break proteins into amino acids. The carnivore liver is large and produces uricase, an enzyme that breaks down uric acid.  The carnivore liver is capable of eliminating 10-15 times more uric acid than the liver of the herbivore (meat digestion releases large amounts of uric acid).

-Large stomach capacity, designed for large less frequent meal consumption. Dogs have a highly elastic stomach designed to hold large quantities of meat, bone, organs, and hide. Their stomachs are simple, with an undeveloped caecum (Feldhamer, G.A. 1999. Mammology: Adaptation, Diversity, and Ecology. McGraw-Hill. pg 260.).  The totally distended stomach can occupy half of the abdominal cavity and the physical digestive system itself is identical to that of the wolf (carnivore).

I was hopeful that you would at least be able to provide some evidence that high carbohydrate kibble diets (remembering that this is what the entire conversation has been about - dont even try to change it now) are beneficial for healthy dogs. However, the lack of any scientific evidence (even though I have provided plenty of human studies), whilst resorting to childish insults and anecdotes of dogs you ‘see’, does not help your case. Im done now, the science truly speaks for itself. As for the diabetes study, you could not have missed the point any more obviously. Im not sure if you even read the whole thing, but it was actually in regards to the similarities in how humans, dogs and other mammals absorb carbohydrates in the small intestine (no, I wasnt referring to diabetes). Totally missed the boat on that one.

The combination of carnivorous canine biology, human studies showing the negative effects of heavy carbohydrate diets, studies showing that dogs have increased mortality on low protein high carbohydrate diets, studies showing the benefits of high protein diets in canines (exactly what raw diets are), a study showing that toxic heavy metals found in pet foods exceeded the safe established limits, plus a complete and utter lack of scientific evidence that kibble diets are actually healthy for dogs; all allow any stable-minded person to conclude that not only is a dog biologically designed to meat from head to toe, it is healthier on an animal protein diet. Im going to leave it there as you keep circling around to “digestible so healthy” and pet food manufacturer websites (Hills, seriously?).  Every single aspect of scientific literature and biology is on the side of low carbohydrate, animal-protein based diets.

I wont be responding after this post (blocked IP - there is no point reading unsubstantiated opinions/anecdotes in my activity feed), as Im sure Ive probably annoyed a few followers with this.This is a biology based blog, not an anecdotal, and certainly not a blog where I allow insults instead of constructive science-based evidence (<evidence which only I have provided).

To those feeding PMR or thinking about it - you’re doing it right. Science; both literature and biology, is 100% on your side.

doggydayjob:

henrythehorrible:

Can we openly talk about prong collars and other methods to train a good walker? No judgement zone.

I’m concerned about Henry’s walking skills lately. We’ve done as much as we can to get him to be a good, slower walker but its just not happening. He…

Q

ixellent asked:

I know we talk about raw diets a lot, but for animals on a prescription diet, how should we handle that? Are prescription diets all bullshit? Is raw feeding simply always going to be the better choice? It just feels like I can't trust my vet regarding food knowing that stuff like Hill's is still basically junk food.

A

animalwelfarists:

Prescription diets are pretty unnecessary, although there are some good ones out there. Raw feeding is almost always, if not always, the ideal option. A lot of health issues can be improved on a raw diet, too!

-Ry

give-a-fuck-about-nature:

If performed on a human being, declawing would be like cutting off each finger at the last knuckle.

(via firedanceryote)