lzbth:

swag won’t pay the bills but apparently neither will your degree

(via super-saiyan-princess)

animalwelfarists:

Cats love fish, perpetuated by cartoons and other media, this is a widely accepted fact… but, is it good for them?

Fish are a great food, an excellent source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids while being low in fat - unfortunately, almost all fish are contaminated with mercury, some more…

My lovely 17 year old mancat, Pounce, has hyperthyroidism, most likely due to fish consumption. He got very high quality dry and canned food throughout his adult life, grain free wellness. So it’s not just low quality foods. He now has to eat crappy medicated vet food… Not my choice, he be on raw if it were up to me. But anywho, keep this is mind for all kitties!

dogjournal:

THE “DRIVEN TO BARK” CAMPAIGN 
Petplan has started the 'Driven to Bark' campaign to raise awareness about the dangers of leaving dogs in hot cars. There is also a White House petition which encourages the passing of laws to address this issue. Unfortunately we hear reports every summer about dogs being left inside hot cars. Click here to learn more about the Driven to Bark campaign. Please share!  dogjournal:

THE “DRIVEN TO BARK” CAMPAIGN 
Petplan has started the 'Driven to Bark' campaign to raise awareness about the dangers of leaving dogs in hot cars. There is also a White House petition which encourages the passing of laws to address this issue. Unfortunately we hear reports every summer about dogs being left inside hot cars. Click here to learn more about the Driven to Bark campaign. Please share! 

dogjournal:

THE “DRIVEN TO BARK” CAMPAIGN 

Petplan has started the 'Driven to Bark' campaign to raise awareness about the dangers of leaving dogs in hot cars. There is also a White House petition which encourages the passing of laws to address this issue. Unfortunately we hear reports every summer about dogs being left inside hot cars. Click here to learn more about the Driven to Bark campaign. Please share! 

(via handsomedogs)

pawsitivelypowerful:

twobigears:

baddognono:

twobigears:

Excellent blog post making the rounds on Facebook. So many people, especially agility people, fail to understand that arousal and drive are not the same thing. I didn’t either for a while, I just knew I didn’t like Ryker’s crazy barking before his agility runs and that he was only winding himself up into a frenzy with it. Requiring him to be quiet and focused outside the ring has been tough but it has made him work better. It certainly hasn’t killed his drive. I actually saw someone at the trial this weekend encouraging her dog to stare and bark and get excited by the dog running the course. Really????

This comment sums up my thoughts perfectly:

"Still it’s very hard to convince the handlers in the highest levels of competition that their dogs would be more focused and able to perform better if they learned to control themselves and not bark en scream for half an hour before they had to perform. They think the dog is showing it’s drive, that he want to perform, while in fact the dog is in overdrive and out of control.
They still think that that frantic behavior leads to the best results on the course. And that, if they would teach the dog some self-control, the dog will be slower on the course.”

This reminds me a lot of the phrase “leaking drive”. I forget where I saw it/heard it but someone told me that when the dog is so aroused that they’re screaming, they’re “leaking drive” because the arousal is taking all the energy/attention/drive away from the dog’s actual work.

I used to stop to watch the agility dogs when I did conformation work but always left because I couldn’t stand the screaming and whining from certain dogs.

It is basically leaking drive, which is talked about a lot in GSD/Malinois circles. Leaking is a problem by itself because the dog can work himself up so that he can’t think, but especially a problem when it manifests as jerky behaviors like barking/screaming at another dog working. Which is unfortunately common at agility trials, and the main reason I don’t do flyball. Ryker is a pretty big leaker but getting better. He barks when excited and can be pretty whiney too.

This is a good article. It’s a huuuuge pet peeve of mine when people praise the frantic dog over the collected dog who brings his drive to the table when needed.

Dakota gets called “low drive” a lot because he’s fairly laidback when not working (we did a lot of calmness exercises for service dog public access training), and he can be hard to “wake up” and get into a work mode sometimes but once he does he has a good amount of workable drive. Not high by any means, but definitely not a low “deadhead”. Unless we’re talking live game or lure coursing, then the beast comes out.

Dakari on the other hand is a bit more on the side of “frantic” and her crazy gets praised a lot but she’s easily distracted from the task, so we usually keep sessions short and sweet. VS Dakota who I can work for an hour plus with his flirt pole toy.

(via simply-canine)

Q

areyougolden asked:

I saw that ask about german sheperds and so I was just wondering what type of dog would be good for first time breeders?

A

naturepunk:

I don’t know enough about breeding to answer that question, but one of my followers might. 

Honestly, I wouldn’t recommend evoking a breeder to almost anyone. It takes a very special kind of person to want to/be able to spend tons of their money and time on pups. The initial cost of creating a good foundation is huge. And you need to make some great contacts first to be able to communicate and get advice from some experiences breeders.

You’ll rarely break even on raising a litter, you’ll often lose money. So you have to be in it for the love of the breed. Be prepared to pay for health checks on all prospective breeding pairs, and pups. Be prepared to hand-raise any pups that don’t thrive. Also be mentally prepared to lose pups, and sometimes birthing mothers. That’s the hardest part about breeding any animal.

You also have to be quite experienced with R+ training (the only way to go, really) so has to raise well socialized pups that are receptive to learning new behaviors.

You also have to be decently well-versed in genetics because you’ll have to understand how traits are passed down from generation to generation. And you absolutely Must be breeding for the betterment of the breed. That means health and temperament first, before looks. Who cares if your line wins BIS if they get bad hips by the time they’re 4.

Personally, I don’t recommend breeding unless you’ve done a few years of research and saving up for a great foundation first. And if you’ve done that, then you’ll be able to tell what sort of breeds you’d want to get into. If you don’t have any clue what breed to go for, you’re a long long way off from being even remotely ready.

unhappyhorses:

Because I’ve had a lot of new people follow me recently, I want to do a quick overview of the four quadrants so everyone’s on the same page. This is a good video explaining how they works, and here’s a short explanation:

  • Positive reinforcement - an animal performs a behavior, receives some kind of pleasant reward, and is therefore more likely to perform that behavior again. Think food rewards, toys, affection.
  • Negative reinforcement - an animal is subjected to something unpleasant, and when it performs a certain behavior, that unpleasantness stops, increasing the likelihood that the behavior will occur again. Think pressure and release, jabbing a horse in the side until they move over, etc.
  • Positive punishment - an animal performs a behavior and is subjected to something unpleasant, which means that they are less likely to do it again. This is really simple to understand. When an animal is struck for biting, or has the leash jerked for looking at a squirrel, they’re being positively punished.
  • Negative punishment - an animal performs a behavior, and something it likes is removed, which means it’s less likely to perform that behavior. If an animal plays too roughly with its handler, and the handler leaves, ending the fun game, the animal has been negatively punished for playing roughly.

These are the basic mechanisms through which all feeling creatures learn, whether they’re being actively trained or just responding to their environment. It’s really important to realize that these are not training techniques. These are not optional. This is the natural way that living creatures learn, and we take advantage of these natural reactions to train.

No matter what methods you think are ethical, no matter what animal you train, no matter how you train, you need to understand these basics, and every training instruction needs to begin with a thorough understanding of these principles.

(via simply-canine)

perfectdogs:

… I actually really don’t like this video???

Wow this video is dumb.

awwww-cute:

Saw this dog for adoption, he’s obviously been practicing for visitors

No, this pup is stressed out. A tight ‘smile’ like that is a calming signal. @notactuallycute

(via fuckyeahloldemort)

Just finished my 3rd R+ training session with Miso/Lumos/Calcifer (we suck at settling on names apparently) and it went SO WELL last night she got ‘sit’ down pretty well, and so I started working on a release cue, which was going well, though she wouldn’t offer it without a lure.

Today, she had sit down pat (with me sitting, and so distractions) but she started offering a hand target when I tried luring her for the release cue. So I went with it and she’s doing pretty well with it!

It was amazing to see her go from just chilling and doing random stuff, and getting fed for it, to her offering different behaviors and trying to figure out what I wanted her to do. Definitely could see the click.

Training was the thing is was most looking forward to when we had Zero, so even though we won’t be able to get to do the same level of training, at least we can so some, and show that cats need mental stimulation and can train really well.

Q

Anonymous asked:

These people DO realize that without reputable breeders, dog breeds would likely die out right?

A

animalwelfarists:

animalwelfarists:

Not only is being against reputable breeders is in the same vein as promoting the abolition of pets, but the only breeding occurring would be from unexpected pregnancies, passing on who knows what traits which can result in a lot of very unwell dogs and high mortality rates among pups and bitches.

-Ry

Especially with the designer dog craze going on right now, it’s absolutely possible that we would no longer have purebred dogs if we were to target reputable breeders.

And it’s important to remember, that even if you passed a law that banned the breeding of dogs… guess who’s most likely to ignore that law? The people doing it for profit. Backyard breeders.

Like Ry said, the only breeding that would be occurring would be oops litters and backyard breeding… and the effect that would have on the health and genetics of dogs goes without saying.

- Dark