Q

ixellent asked:

I know we talk about raw diets a lot, but for animals on a prescription diet, how should we handle that? Are prescription diets all bullshit? Is raw feeding simply always going to be the better choice? It just feels like I can't trust my vet regarding food knowing that stuff like Hill's is still basically junk food.

A

animalwelfarists:

Prescription diets are pretty unnecessary, although there are some good ones out there. Raw feeding is almost always, if not always, the ideal option. A lot of health issues can be improved on a raw diet, too!

-Ry

give-a-fuck-about-nature:

If performed on a human being, declawing would be like cutting off each finger at the last knuckle.

(via firedanceryote)

Q

otterplotter asked:

(1/2) People absolutely should cook meat (even just in boiling water w/ a thermometer) to 160 F before feeding, especially to puppies and any dog over 5 years. I read the 'myths' section and was extremely disappointed to see that it ignored that dogs have a lower pH (~2 when 'fasted' or only fed 2x a day) which means bacteria can take hold and that parasites are common and have long term complications even if they don't appear to use the dog as a host.

A

raw-fed-pets:

kellyclowers:

raw-fed-pets:

(2/2) Heating meat doesn’t change its nutritional content at all. If done via boiling to just barely 160 inside, the texture, enzyme reactivity, and ‘rawness’ can be maintained to ensure the dental benefits of a raw diet. Human-grade meat /must/ be heated to 160 F to be safe. Please think about it for your pet’s sake—especially if you live in an area with other dogs and could end up infecting less healthy dogs with passed or hosted parasites.

Incorrect. Dogs digestive systems have not changed since the introduction of cooked carbohydrate-based foods a few decades ago. These foods actually raise the PH promoting alkalinity as opposed to acidity, and the very limited research we have on canine ph has all been performed on kibble-fed dogs. Meaning on a raw diet their PH would drop even lower. Also you never mentioned the various other mechanisms by which dogs handle bacteria - only PH. You seem to forget that a dog’s entire physiology is geared toward a raw diet and this mechanism works in synergy with other factors. Just to outline some of the many ways dogs manage bacteria:Salivary lysozyme, very short gut length for pushing through raw animal protein as opposed to plant ‘fermentation’, gastric acidity and a very high bile load (Dr Karen Becker discusses bile in link below and in other vids).

Also it is proven by various literature that while fat-soluble nutrients are not drastically altered during cooking, water soluble nutrients are indeed lost when foods are heated (1, 2, 3, 4). Also here’s another one: "All vitamins decreased during cooking, with thiamine showing the highest losses, from 73% up to 100%. In conclusion, the cooking and trimming of meat cuts considerably affected the nutrients in various ways and to different degrees, which should be taken into account when the nutrient intakes of meat are estimated" (study). Another (seriously there’s hundreds): “Generally, moisture and fat contents of broiler meat were significantly decreased by cooking, but the fat content of the dark muscles showed no significant change when cooked by microwave. All cooked meats were significantly lower (p < 0·05) in thiamin content than raw meat” (study).

Protein is denatured (inactivation by heating, disrupting the 3 dimensional protein structure) and other enzymes which are invaluable in digestion are destroyed. Even if you compare 100g cooked vs raw beef heart on the USDA database, this is not at all accurate becuase of the moisture content (thereby seemingly ‘concentrating’ nutrients in cooked meat becuase it has lost so much water volume/weight). As for enzymes, there are thousands of different types, and sure there may be some that survive heating. However, all current research emphasizes that 'Enzyme research has revealed the importance of raw foods in the diet. The enzymes in raw food help start the process of digestion and reduce the body’s need to produce digestive enzymes. All enzymes are deactivated at a wet-heat temperature of 118 degrees Fahrenheit, and a dry-heat temperature of about 150 degrees. It is one of those happy designs of nature that foods and liquid at 117 degrees can be touched without pain, but liquids over 118 degrees will burn. Thus we have a built-in mechanism for determining whether or not the food we are eating still contains its enzyme content' (source). Cooking can actually be dangerous in some circumstances, for example cats who have an essential requirement for the amino acid taurine, which is also deactivated by heating meat. This is why kibble companies have to add synthetic taurine into the mixture following cooking.

You also seem to be forgetting that all dogs regardless of diet have very similar levels of bacteria in their systems (study here). Assuming they are on a correct raw diet, bacteria just passes straight through them (hence why you shouldnt handle/eat their crap). Kibble-fed pets are at an increased risk due to compromised gastric acidity and this is why so many are affected by kibble contamination recalls.

Again another thing you are forgetting is that bacteria is in everything. Dogs eat feces and roll in dead birds all the time but owners do not rush them to the vet becuase quite simply - they are not humans. Dogs have the physiological adaptations to manage bacteria. I totally understand your uneducated viewpoint and I even remember cooking a disgusting looking mince (eyeballs, intestines etc) for my dog way back in the kibble days.  Wouldnt dream of doing it now. Parasites are also a completely moot subject becuase of regular worming treatment, deep freezing, and sourcing organs from human-grade heavily inspected facilities. Like bacteria, parasite eggs are also everywhere in the outdoor environment, from waterways to grass, animal feces, and dirt. In fact many of these places are ideal locations for certain stages of parasitic life cycles (eg many Nematodes). Education about the difference between carnivores, omnivores and herbivores is the key and I reiterate: Dogs are not humans.

Basic canine physiology/Raw Feeding - Karen Becker DVM

Cooked Food vs Raw (Incl refs)

Cooking can change nutritional profiles somewhat. It isn’t really an issue though. Raw food nuts may have a bit more of a leg to stand on with dogs and such than with people, but it’s still shaky.

As for the carbs, no, it hasn’t changed in a few decades, obviously. But dogs can digest carbs just fine. Which isn’t to say you can or should feed them a vegan or vegetarian diet. But getting some, even a lot of their food as carbs isn’t an issue.

http://www.nature.com/news/dog-s-dinner-was-key-to-domestication-1.12280

It is a major issue to feed solely cooked diets to carnivores becuase of these nutrient alterations. It can be very dangerous long-term, especially in regards to essential amino acids and water soluble vitamins (not stored by body) which are destroyed by heating. It isnt even remotely comparable to human diets becuase we eat a very large variety of foods from cooked, raw, animal proteins/fats, plant proteins, both refined and unrefined carbohydrates, fermented foods etc etc. If we were designed to eat only fruit, for example, and we ended up cooking every type of fruit we ate - we would certainly get deficiencies. This is what Im trying to say about dogs. They are designed to eat raw animal protein and therefore feeding an entirely cooked diet will certainly cause health problems in the future. Not to mention edible bone is vital for the CA:P ratio, and cannot be cooked due to changes in the molecular structure (intestinal perforations, maldigestion, other punctures).

As for the carbohydrate issue, dogs have absolutely zero biological requirement for these at all. They are only included in such volumes (30-70%) in processed pet foods due to very low cost, shelf-life (years), accessibility, mixture stability, and the efficient running of the machinery. It is very smart business.

As for the link you provided:

-Only considers starch. There are many types of carbohydrates.

-Doesnt even research whether the amy genes are actually expressed.

-Many dogs will have amylase genes comparable to wolves. Between 4 and 30 copies, whereas wolves have 2. Again, expression is a major issue, plus they never discussed the relevance of the numbers ie whether 15 is ideal for a carbohydrate based diet in a  carnivore lacking the salivary amylase of plant/carbohydrate eaters, lacking the grinding teeth for predigestion, and with only pancreatic amylase as a back up. Plus the very short, simple digestive tract can never allow for full absorption. Obviously material passes through the small intestine quickly in carnivores resulting in very large and offensive stools in pets fed a carbohydrate-based diet. Plant eaters have longer digestive digestive tracts and often multiple stomachs.

-The carbohydrates in pet food are cooked at extreme temperatures and are highly refined. Highly refined, heavy carbohydrate diets are linked to countless health problems in humans including diabetes, obesity (incl all health effects that go along with that), and bowel disease. Not to mention about 80% of pets have periodontal disease by age 2/3 which is again directly due to their high carbohydrate diets. Diets which also lack the dental workout provided by their biological diet. Note that this disease often leads to systemic health problems including heart and liver failure.

-Humans have known for a very long time that dogs can digest some carbohydrate material. Perhaps the most fatal flaw: Digestible does not equal healthy.

Q

Anonymous asked:

i read somewhere that when using +r training, you shouldn't even say the word "no" to your dog. Is that true? I mean how do you get your dog to not do things? I mean I understand the basic idea of +r training, but can a neutral world like "no" (that is, not being used to scold, but to instruct in a calm and gentle, but firm tone) really cause problems? The way I see it (though I could absolutely be wrong), it can be used as a kind of catch-all command for them to stop whatever they're doing(1/2)

A

animalwelfarists:

but not in a scoldy way. Like “sit” isn’t used because standing is bad, and it’s not scolding them for standing. They just do it because their person says to. I don’t know if I’m making any sense whatsoever but I hope so. I’m just curious on what y’all’s take on this is.

The problem with “no” is that it is a catch-all command. A command should pertain to a specific desired behavior so as not to confuse the dog… “no” is, essentially, useless. 

If you want a dog to stop jumping, try “off.” If you want your dog to pause, “wait.” If you want your dog to remain stationary until further command is given, use “stay.” 

So it’s not so much “no is a negative term,” it’s just that the dog can get confused if you’re using the same command when you’re trying to get him to do different things.

-Ry

miscellaneousthoughts012:

sammiwolfe:

pitbulled:

impactings:

Hey tumblr! Did you know that if you suffer from depression / anxiety or any other mental illness, you can register your dog as an emotional support animal, making it illegal for a landlord to refuse to rent to…

vetmedlife:

This does go for all animals, but since dog behaviour is my comfort zone and since most of these posts I see are of dogs being stressed or mishandled I’m going to focus on dogs. Anyone else who is more knowledgable on other animals expression of stress and behaviour are super…

Q

Anonymous asked:

Why is the fussy eating method not a good idea for cats? Also my cat is really fussy but idk what to do? he doesn't eat anything aside from treats

A

raw-fed-pets:

Hi, its becuase cats can get hepatic lipidosis if they havent eaten in awhile. Unfortunately older cats can sometimes be difficult to transition as they imprint on food at a young age.There are other things you can try with cats though:

-Start with cooked meat and cook it less and less eat day until raw. Or pan sear the outside of meat (no bones) in order for it to smell enticing.

-Stop all kibble free-feeding as this only fills them up and its not great for their digestive system to graze.Cats can often smell kibble when it is in the house so aim to get rid of it or hide it well.

-Start a regular feeding schedule. Feed a smaller breakfast, play with your cat during the day, and offer the new meal at night so your cat is very hungry.

-Try a lot of different brands or meats. If your cat has a favourite canned flavour (eg gravy from the canned food) drizzle some of this over the new meal.

-If trying to switch to raw, follow the tips on this page and begin by moving from kibble to canned to raw. There may be a few more ideas in my fussy tag too. :)

handsomedogs:

{x}{x}
Would You Rather…
Have a Borzoi or a Saluki?

Hmmm.. Tough one.. I love the saluki&#8217;s looks, but the borzoi&#8217;s sheer size and floofiness is winning me over I think. I&#8217;m going with the floofy gazelle, the borzoi. handsomedogs:

{x}{x}
Would You Rather…
Have a Borzoi or a Saluki?

Hmmm.. Tough one.. I love the saluki&#8217;s looks, but the borzoi&#8217;s sheer size and floofiness is winning me over I think. I&#8217;m going with the floofy gazelle, the borzoi.

handsomedogs:

{x}{x}

Would You Rather…

Have a Borzoi or a Saluki?

Hmmm.. Tough one.. I love the saluki’s looks, but the borzoi’s sheer size and floofiness is winning me over I think. I’m going with the floofy gazelle, the borzoi.

Q

Anonymous asked:

How come calico cats are always female?

A

edwardspoonhands:

Because only female cats can be calico. It’s actually REALLY FASCINATING! Let Derek explain.

No one believes me when I tell them all calico/torti cats are female! Here’s why!!