schim:


Cats who can’t figure out walls [x]

PLEASE TAKE YOUR CAT TO THE VET IF YOU SEE THEM DOING THIS BEHAVIOR OVER TIME.
It’s called “head pressing” and it occurs in dogs and cats. 

Head pressing is characterized by the compulsive act of pressing the head against a wall or other object for no apparent reason. This generally indicates damage to the nervous system, which may result from a number of varying causes, including prosencephalon disease (in which the forebrain and thalamusparts of the brain are damaged), or toxic poisoning.

http://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/neurological/c_ct_headpressing
http://www.vet.cornell.edu/FHC/health_resources/toxoplasmosis.cfm (head pressing is listed as a symptom)
http://sevneurology.com/patients/clip-multilobular-osteochondroma (About a dog’s brain tumor but head pressing is listed as a symptom)
schim:


Cats who can’t figure out walls [x]

PLEASE TAKE YOUR CAT TO THE VET IF YOU SEE THEM DOING THIS BEHAVIOR OVER TIME.
It’s called “head pressing” and it occurs in dogs and cats. 

Head pressing is characterized by the compulsive act of pressing the head against a wall or other object for no apparent reason. This generally indicates damage to the nervous system, which may result from a number of varying causes, including prosencephalon disease (in which the forebrain and thalamusparts of the brain are damaged), or toxic poisoning.

http://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/neurological/c_ct_headpressing
http://www.vet.cornell.edu/FHC/health_resources/toxoplasmosis.cfm (head pressing is listed as a symptom)
http://sevneurology.com/patients/clip-multilobular-osteochondroma (About a dog’s brain tumor but head pressing is listed as a symptom)
schim:


Cats who can’t figure out walls [x]

PLEASE TAKE YOUR CAT TO THE VET IF YOU SEE THEM DOING THIS BEHAVIOR OVER TIME.
It’s called “head pressing” and it occurs in dogs and cats. 

Head pressing is characterized by the compulsive act of pressing the head against a wall or other object for no apparent reason. This generally indicates damage to the nervous system, which may result from a number of varying causes, including prosencephalon disease (in which the forebrain and thalamusparts of the brain are damaged), or toxic poisoning.

http://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/neurological/c_ct_headpressing
http://www.vet.cornell.edu/FHC/health_resources/toxoplasmosis.cfm (head pressing is listed as a symptom)
http://sevneurology.com/patients/clip-multilobular-osteochondroma (About a dog’s brain tumor but head pressing is listed as a symptom)
schim:


Cats who can’t figure out walls [x]

PLEASE TAKE YOUR CAT TO THE VET IF YOU SEE THEM DOING THIS BEHAVIOR OVER TIME.
It’s called “head pressing” and it occurs in dogs and cats. 

Head pressing is characterized by the compulsive act of pressing the head against a wall or other object for no apparent reason. This generally indicates damage to the nervous system, which may result from a number of varying causes, including prosencephalon disease (in which the forebrain and thalamusparts of the brain are damaged), or toxic poisoning.

http://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/neurological/c_ct_headpressing
http://www.vet.cornell.edu/FHC/health_resources/toxoplasmosis.cfm (head pressing is listed as a symptom)
http://sevneurology.com/patients/clip-multilobular-osteochondroma (About a dog’s brain tumor but head pressing is listed as a symptom)

schim:

Cats who can’t figure out walls [x]

PLEASE TAKE YOUR CAT TO THE VET IF YOU SEE THEM DOING THIS BEHAVIOR OVER TIME.

It’s called “head pressing” and it occurs in dogs and cats. 

Head pressing is characterized by the compulsive act of pressing the head against a wall or other object for no apparent reason. This generally indicates damage to the nervous system, which may result from a number of varying causes, including prosencephalon disease (in which the forebrain and thalamusparts of the brain are damaged), or toxic poisoning.

http://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/neurological/c_ct_headpressing

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/FHC/health_resources/toxoplasmosis.cfm (head pressing is listed as a symptom)

http://sevneurology.com/patients/clip-multilobular-osteochondroma (About a dog’s brain tumor but head pressing is listed as a symptom)

(via notactuallycute)

Just because you’ve read some stuff about dogs, does not mean you understand dog behavior.

Just because you used to have a dog, does not mean you understand dog behavior.

Just because you have a dog now, does not mean you understand dog behavior.

Just because you’ve had dog(s) your whole life, does not mean you understand dog behavior.

Just because you work with dogs sometimes, does not mean you understand dog behavior.

Just because working with dogs is your profession, does not mean you understand dog behavior.

Just because you show dogs, does not mean you understand dog behavior.

Just because you breed dogs, does not mean you understand dog behavior.

Just because you ‘train’ dogs, does not mean you understand dog behavior.

Just because you have a tv show and an international following about dogs and dog ‘behavior,’ does not mean you understand dog behavior.

In short: we’re always learning more about dog behavior so the least you can do is educate yourself about the more recent things we’ve learned about them, and don’t scoff at them bc ‘I think I know my dog.’

Q

druidwolfdoctor asked:

Do wolves see in black and white or colour? I'd have thought that since dogs see monochrome, wolves would too. And that they rely on scent and sound more than sight. But I'm not sure.

A

howtoskinatiger:

wolveswolves:

Wolves can see some colour. We don’t know much about it yet, but it is believed that wolves may be only partially color blind. Wolves have only red and blue photo receptors in their eyes, and are green colour blind. Unlike humans, who have red, green, and blue photo receptors.

It’s actually a myth that dogs are color blind. This is the actual color range dogs have; 

image

(Source)

Wolves and other canids are believed to have a similar range. 

fullpelt:

How to behave when confronted by a livestock guardian dog.

(via animalwelfarists)

melonberrymint:

So I saw this today on Pinterest and then found the Etsy link and I have to make a small PSA.

Please do not ever ever ever keep your betta (or any fish for that matter) in a permanent tank this small. EVER.

The seller claims that betta don’t need aeration, filtration, or a lot of water to live a long and healthy life of two years, so a wine bottle is the perfect fashionable tank for them. This is a lie.

Small tanks mean low water temp, which makes betta, a tropical fish, sick. Any good betta tank will have a heater that can be regulated to 80 degrees.

The smallest tank any betta should live in is one gallon, which is nearly three times as much as a wine bottle (or those stupid “betta vases”) will hold. Betta will thrive much better in a three gallon or larger tank.

There is nowhere in this jar for the betta to hide when he’s scared or nap when he’s tired. They do enjoy playing with their humans, but they need some aquarium decor to interact with when you’re not around.

The seller suggests cleaning the tank once a week and that filtration isn’t needed, but bettas eat and poop just like any other fish and create waste that is harmful to them. The small amount of water in this jar should be changed daily, not weekly, to avoid ammonia buildup and remove uneaten food crud. Of course, a daily water change could be avoided with a good sized tank and a nice, slow-current filter.

This person has already sold a number of these upcycled tanks to people who don’t know any better about betta care, and it makes me so sad that their beautiful fish are living unhappy lives.

(via naturepunk)

heartofhorselords:

squeaky-bits:

Different training methods are like different religions; you are free to believe in them but please don’t try to force them on other people.

Ew gross and also no - conflating people’s personal choices of religious belief with animal handling and potential animal welfare issues are not akin and this is a really terrible analogy to make.

(via animalwelfarists)

torentialtribute:

If you’re looking for the “cheapest/easiest” pet

  • don’t get a pet

(via non-wolfdogs)

Q

lieutenantmid asked:

Do you have any helpful links about raw feeding dogs? I am considering switching my dog to raw but I have no clue where to begin.

A

animalwelfarists:

General Sites

Raw Diets for Dogs

Hope this helps!

-Ry

Forget if I posted this already but here it is again because its awesome and helpful.